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On The Handwritten Notes That Won An Election


Can it be only a few short years ago that my bosses talked about "Twittering?"

That it took 5 hours to approve a single Tweet, which had to go through a "workflow?"

Shaking my head.

The "business case" required.

Agony and hand-wringing.

Confusion about metrics - is it "reach" or is it "impressions" or "total exposures" or what?

I know, let's make ourselves look good - by only sharing good news! In a peppy voice?

Or, let's talk to ourselves a bit...with "grip-and-grin" handshake photos taken at our latest event.

Wow.

Call me controversial but I think it's safe to say that this is the first presidential election won on the basis of...Tweets.

What made those Tweets compelling?

It wasn't the fact that the candidate quoted himself a lot.

It wasn't the whirring blades of the helicopter overhead.

It wasn't that he landed in some remote part of the world, and gave us moment-by-moment updates about the fascinating people and cuisine.

No.

The reason we loved those Tweets, was because they were so very real.

These were the thoughts of a man who spoke directly to us.

Who literally took a pen to paper.

Who confided in us his vision, his dreams, his soaring aspirations - and yes, also raw emotions that many of us keep to ourselves.

Bitterness.

Anger.

Fury.

Fear.

I think it's safe to say that nobody, not even the experts, saw such a successful Twitter account coming.

Nobody dared to breathe the words that were the truth - the truth - which is that Donald J. Trump knocked it out of the park, because he used a free social media tool.

In the way it was perhaps not intended.

For a serious man, a significant leader, to simply be himself.

______________
All opinions my own. Public domain photo by geralt via Pixabay.



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