Thursday, May 23, 2013

Start By Firing Executive Bullies

It is a very big leap from the thesis "fire unproductive workers" to the reality of evaluating true productivity. Some employees are productive but not in ways that are listed in their job description - such as those who simply boost the morale of everybody else. Example - Read about "Zach Galifianakis' Red Carpet Date"

Others do crap work that nobody else will do, that doesn't need to get done, but that the organization requires. They are productive in the sense that they create social stability.

Still others are eager to learn and contribute but make too many mistakes to really generate much in the way of results. They will generate results in the future, but not now.

So what about truly unproductive workers?

Perhaps we should consider seriously evaluating those at the top of the pay scale. If they are receiving a disproportionate share of salary they should be held accountable for generating disproportionately high results, productivity or outcomes.

Screenshot via Gawker.

Put simply, what that means is it should cost more to fire them than to have them on board.
Examples of highly productive executives are those who find ways to achieve results innovatively, cut costs, reduce duplication of effort, and eliminate unnecessary processes.

Some executives simply "coast" by, but they are highly productive anyway because their institutional value cannot be replaced and it would cost too much to figure out what they can tell you in five minutes. Or, they are highly networked and can leverage relationships to get things done. Again, a simple conversation that leads to a working relationship can save years of useless effort down the road.

Some people are paid a great deal of money and they are not only unproductive, but they actually detract from productivity. They don't add anything valuable to the organization. They insist on doing things in ways that waste time, effort and sap motivation. And unfortunately sometimes they abuse people in the workplace, leading otherwise highly productive workers to be sapped of morale and causing costly litigation for the organization down the road.

To my mind, if you're looking for ways to eliminate unproductive workers, it makes the most sense to start with highly paid workers that detract from the productivity of everybody else.

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Copyright 2016 by Dannielle Blumenthal, Ph.D. All opinions are the author's own. Powered by Blogger.