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Showing posts from October, 2010

Buy Stock in Attitude

By now it is practically brand religion that “you don’t control your brand.”

Consultants routinely lecture their clients that:

“Brand = the sum total of other people’s perceptions of you, NOT what you are trying to say.”
This is actually an important message. As many clients continue to think that brand DOES equal whatever it is they want to say. (Or more frighteningly they still think that it equals their logo.)
So this isnot the brand (the Coca-Cola logo).






And this is not the brand (Coca-Cola press release).

And not even this is the brand (Coca-Cola-issued blog).
This is the brand – not the total brand, but part of it – because it represents an audience’s perspective not the sender’s. (An article written about Coca-Cola online.)
And so is this (a positive image generated by somebody “out there” who is hopefully not propagandizing for CC).





If the brand is a product like Coca-Cola, then brand-ing becomes a very simple exercise.

Measure perception of the icon, come up with the baseline, creat…

Why Tomorrow's "Government Doesn't ****" Rally Is Bad For My Brand

Before I say anything, let me be clear that I support the mission of GovLoop and think it has accomplished a lot. I also appreciate GL's kind support of my writing, having featured my blogs, asking me to speak, and sponsoring a Federal Communicators Network event this summer. I am worried as I post this that I will offend people who have been good colleagues and peers for more than a year. But I am sufficiently concerned about tomorrow's rally that I feel I have to say something. Here goes.1. The title is so offensive that I won't even repeat it. No matter how much people say bad things about federal employees, we do have a "brand" of professionalism, dignity, and respect that is undermined by language like this. It is not the norm to talk like this in a federal workplace, and it is not the norm to speak or write like this on behalf of federal employees in public.2. The title of the rally violates a basic rule of communications. Which is to stick with the facts a…

Oakley’s $41 Million Marketing Experiment

It was a life-and-death drama that bound the globe together—the plight and rescue of 33 Chilean miners during the summer and fall of 2010. Nearly three dozen men, buried more than 2,000 feet underground, trapped for a total of 68 days.It was one of those stories that was at once completely remote from my life and yet felt extremely close. I could not look at images of the mine on TV, because I imagined myself one of the miners, slowly suffocating beneath the earth’s surface. I felt the powerlessness of the women who were waiting for them. I felt angry for the men forced to work in an exploitive system beyond their control. And I saw G-d in the way they struggled, stayed hopeful and constructive, and were eventually rescued by amazing technology that can only be described as a miracle.The world, it seems, was as mesmerized as me, watching online and offline with bated breath as the story unfolded. As Mashable reports, the number of people watching this story is staggering:·4 million pa…

The Anti-Social Network

If you find credible the portrayal of Mark Zuckerberg in “The Social Network,” the world’s biggest social network was founded by someone whose relationship to society is ambivalent and rocky:He can’t relate to other people, but he can create programs that they will want to use He can’t handle rejection, but he can create a program that lets everybody be included in some wayHe is obsessed with an isolated activity, computer programming, but the programs he creates involve connecting people togetherHe is angry at the limitations society has artificially placed on technology, but he forms a group to create a product that will overcome those limitationsHe is deceptive to those around him, but is also brave enough to tell truth to powerHe believes himself superior to the powers that be, but on the other hand is pained by a sense of inferiority and rejectionPerhaps the most prominent characteristic of Zuckerberg as portrayed in the movie is that he is so casual about other people’s feelings.…